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11 Attributes I Learned Over The Last 30 Years That Employers Want In An Employee

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THIS summer marks my 30 years of working!  I’ve been an employer AND an employee. SO I want to share with you some of what I’ve learned along the way in regards to what most employers are looking for in an employee. If you are looking for a job, these might be helpful. Of course there are more to the list but these are the ones that consistently came up for me:

  1. Able to express your ideas clearly and confidently in speech and in writing.
  2. Work confidently within a group.
  3. Gather information systematically to establish facts & principles. Problem solving.
  4. Able to act on initiative, identify opportunities & proactive in putting forward ideas & solutions.
  5. Determination to get things done. Make things happen & constantly looking for better ways of doing things.
  6. Adapt successfully to changing situations & environments.
  7. Manage time effectively, prioritizing tasks and able to make deadlines.
  8. Maintains effective performance under pressure.
  9. Adheres to standards & procedures, maintains confidentiality and questions inappropriate behavior.
  10. Pays care & attention to quality in all their work. Supports & empowers others
  11. Shows up to work everyday. Good attendance.
 
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Posted by on August 22, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Sort Out Sunday- How To Answer The Question: What Are Your Greatest Strengths?

Weight-Lifter

This question may seem easy, but it’s NOT.  You don’t want to come across as egotistical or arrogant. You don’t want to come across TOO humble and meek either. What IS your greatest strength? What ARE your greatest strengths???

Your key strategy should be to first uncover your interviewer’s greatest wants and needs before you answer questions.  As early as you can in the interview, ask for a more complete description of what the position entails. You might say: “I have a number of accomplishments I’d like to tell you about, but I want to make the best use of our time together and talk directly to your needs. To help me do, that, could you tell me more about the most important priorities of this position? All I know is what I (heard from the recruiter, read in the classified ad, etc.)”

Then, ALWAYS follow-up with a second and possibly, third question, to draw out his needs even more. Surprisingly, it’s usually this second or third question that unearths what the interviewer is most looking for. You might ask simply, “And in addition to that?…” or, “Is there anything else you see as essential to success in this position? This process will not feel easy or natural at first, because it is easier simply to answer questions, but only if you uncover the employer’s wants and needs will your answers make the most sense. Practice asking these key questions before giving your answers, the process will feel more natural and you will be light years ahead of the other job candidates you’re competing with.

After uncovering what the employer is looking for, describe why the needs of this job bear striking parallels to tasks you’ve succeeded at before. Be sure to illustrate with specific examples of your responsibilities and especially your achievements, all of which are geared to present yourself as a perfect match for the needs he has just described.

Also prior to any interview, you should have a list mentally prepared of your greatest strengths. You should also have, a specific example or two, which illustrates each strength, an example chosen from your most recent and most impressive achievements.
You should, have this list of your greatest strengths and corresponding examples from your achievements so well committed to memory that you can recite them at a moments notice. Then, once you uncover your interviewer’s greatest wants and needs, you can choose those achievements from your list that best match up.

As a general guideline, the 10 most desirable traits that all employers love to see in their employees are:

1. A proven track record as an achiever…especially if your achievements match up with the employer’s greatest wants and needs.
2. Intelligence…management “savvy”.
3. Honesty…integrity…a decent human being.
4. Good fit with corporate culture…someone to feel comfortable with…a team player who meshes well with interviewer’s team.
5. Likeability…positive attitude…sense of humor.
6. Good communication skills.
7. Dedication…willingness to walk the extra mile to achieve excellence.
8. Definiteness of purpose…clear goals.
9. Enthusiasm…high level of motivation.
10. Confident…healthy…a leader.

 

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Interview Tip: How To Act In The Age Of Too Much Information

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On a job interview you may get the question: Tell me about yourself.

 About 80% of all interviews begin with this “innocent” question. Many candidates, unprepared for the question, skewer themselves by rambling, recapping their life story, delving into ancient work history or sharing TOO much of their personal matters.

ANSWER: Start with the present and tell why you are well qualified for the position. Remember that the key to all successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for. In other words you must sell what the buyer is buying. This is the single most important strategy in job hunting.

So, before you answer this or any question it’s imperative that you try to uncover your interviewer’s greatest need, want, problem or goal. To do so, you can follow this one tip:

As early as you can in the interview, ask for a more complete description of what the position entails. You might say: “I have a number of accomplishments I’d like to tell you about, but I want to make the best use of our time together and talk directly to your needs. To help me do, that, could you tell me more about the most important priorities of this position? All I know is what I (heard from the recruiter, read in the classified ad, etc.)”

Then, ALWAYS follow-up with a second and possibly, third question, to draw out his needs even more. Surprisingly, it’s usually this second or third question that unearths what the interviewer is most looking for.
You might ask simply, “And in addition to that?…” or, “Is there anything else you see as essential to success in this position?:
This process will not feel easy or natural at first, because it is easier simply to answer questions, but only if you uncover the employer’s wants and needs will your answers make the most sense. Practice asking these key questions before giving your answers, the process will feel more natural and you will be light years ahead of the other job candidates you’re competing with.
After uncovering what the employer is looking for, describe why the needs of this job bear striking parallels to tasks you’ve succeeded at before. Be sure to illustrate with specific examples of your responsibilities and especially your achievements, all of which are geared to present yourself as a perfect match for the needs he has just described.

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Super Tip Tuesday- Tips To Improve A Resume

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My resume posts seem to be popular with my readers. There are so many mistakes that are made when writing a resume that even seemingly smart people make. I want all of us working and making money. I will continue to offer any advice and tips and news I find out. 

Remove everything that starts with “responsibilities included” and replace that with on-the-job accomplishments.

A resume is a marketing piece that presents you in the best possible light, for the purpose of getting invited to a job interview. It’s not an official personnel document, job application, career obituary or a confessional.

Decide on a job target/job objective that can be stated in about 7 to 10 words. Anything beyond that is probably “fluff” and indicates a lack of clarity and direction.

If you’re over 40 or 50 or 60 , remember that you don’t have to present your entire work history! You can simply label that part of your resume “Recent Work History” or “Relevant Work History” and then describe only the last 10 or 15 years of your experience. At the end of your 10-15 year work history, you could add a paragraph headed “Prior relevant experience” and simply refer to any additional important (but ancient) jobs without mentioning dates.

 
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Posted by on August 12, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Super Tip Tuesday: A Good Resume

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1. Your audience. Think about the position(s) you are aiming for and what kind of job would you like? If you already have a job to apply for and a copy of the job description, you can use that as a guide If not, then Google positions that are similar. It is important to know who your audience when presenting your resume.

2. You. Now that the position and requirements are clear, how does your experience match up? An effective résumé clearly establishes that you are qualified in each of the primary aspects of the particular job. Your goal is to make it easy for the person hiring to look at your résumé and quickly determine that you are a “right fit” for the position. A “one size fits all” résumé never works as well as one that is customized to a specific role, because it requires the reader to think about how other experiences relate to desired qualifications. Hiring authorities may not take the time to try to “figure” you out! .

3. Expand Beyond the Tasks. Most recruiters know the general duties related to careers within their specific fields. What really stands out is the impact and results you had within your career. For example, a retail sales associate may have been one of the top sellers in the Men’s Shoe Department and rose to the ranks of sitting in meetings with shoe buyers and helped determine what shoes were brought in to the company.List that! ” Raised shoe department sales 60% percent from the time I started. assisted with Shoe Buyers with picking out product”.Almost every role has a measurement of success – customer satisfaction, time to complete a task, volume of activity completed, error rate or even internal performance measurement rankings. If applicable, list those accomplishments or the impact you made in the role.

4. Appearance.  A résumé is a visual document. This means that using a layout that is organized, symmetrical, allows resting places for the eyes with good use of white space and is not overly text heavy or overly styled works best Find a nice clear font. Keep it neat and clean. Many say keep it to ONE page. The bottom line is a resume that looks like a book often scares off the reader because it looks like too much work.

5. A Second Look.  Always print and review. Make changes, print and review again. Writing a résumé is not fun. It is tedious and requires thinking about a tremendous amount of detail. But you want a job and you want to have the best chance of getting that job.  Hiring managers look at the résumé as your one chance to make a great first impression. If you take the easy way out with your résumé when you are trying to make the best impression, what will that mean when you are an employee? Get a second pair of eyes if necessary. Check for spelling and grammatical errors. Then make changes and print out again. It is not uncommon that you may print out many copies before it is ready to send out.

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 10, 2014 in Organizing

 

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Super Tip Thursday- More Online Job Searches

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Yesterday I listed some job search resources in Do You Need A Job?, and today that continues with a few more. The last three are for the non-profit sector!  Click on any listed below for more details:

CareerBuilder.com

Careeronestop/org

JobSearchUSA.org

Glassdoor.com

 jobs.lawa.org

USAjobs.gov

Nonprofitjobs.org

Encore.org

Commongoodcareers.org

jobgarden.co

 
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Posted by on June 5, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Fast Friday Tip: Free Job Hunt Apps.

apps

I read somewhere that one in three job searches is conducted on a mobile device! Getting a job may not be easy, but the search is! Here are few apps that are free ( and Android and iPhone compatible) and worth checking out:

INDEEDJOBS

SIMPLYHIRED

Monster.com

LinkedIn

TWEETMYJOBS

JOBCOMPASS

 

 

 
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Posted by on March 28, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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