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Two Things To Leave Off A Resume!

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What to put on a resume has changed over the years. Nowadays it is suggested to not start a resume off with an objective. Also if you are of a certain age (I’m 45), it is okay to leave off High School when listing your education. Here are three more things to leave off a resume:

1.  Age–  References to your age, including graduation dates and an employment history that extends beyond fifteen to twenty years, allow the individual reviewing your resume to establish a clear sense of your age (at least to the extent of calculating a minimum age). Don’t actually list your age.  While age discrimination is illegal, most employers view more youthful applicants as being more desirable for a variety of reasons.  Don’t give the prospective employer the opportunity to use your age against you.

2.  Gaps in employment– unemployment happens. Gaps happen too. The job market is tough these days. But employment gaps look bad to most employers, no matter what the reason. If your resume displays significant gaps between previous jobs, then your marketability and potential value come into question.  Either you are taking extended vacations between jobs or are having difficulties in finding new opportunities.  Neither of these scenarios enhances your image as a job candidate.  So on your resume, you may want to consider eliminating the months and using only the year dates.

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You want to draw the RIGHT attention to your resume! You don’t want anything on paper that might not get you to the next level.

 

 
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Posted by on November 10, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Sort Out Sunday- How To Answer The Question: What Are Your Greatest Strengths?

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This question may seem easy, but it’s NOT.  You don’t want to come across as egotistical or arrogant. You don’t want to come across TOO humble and meek either. What IS your greatest strength? What ARE your greatest strengths???

Your key strategy should be to first uncover your interviewer’s greatest wants and needs before you answer questions.  As early as you can in the interview, ask for a more complete description of what the position entails. You might say: “I have a number of accomplishments I’d like to tell you about, but I want to make the best use of our time together and talk directly to your needs. To help me do, that, could you tell me more about the most important priorities of this position? All I know is what I (heard from the recruiter, read in the classified ad, etc.)”

Then, ALWAYS follow-up with a second and possibly, third question, to draw out his needs even more. Surprisingly, it’s usually this second or third question that unearths what the interviewer is most looking for. You might ask simply, “And in addition to that?…” or, “Is there anything else you see as essential to success in this position? This process will not feel easy or natural at first, because it is easier simply to answer questions, but only if you uncover the employer’s wants and needs will your answers make the most sense. Practice asking these key questions before giving your answers, the process will feel more natural and you will be light years ahead of the other job candidates you’re competing with.

After uncovering what the employer is looking for, describe why the needs of this job bear striking parallels to tasks you’ve succeeded at before. Be sure to illustrate with specific examples of your responsibilities and especially your achievements, all of which are geared to present yourself as a perfect match for the needs he has just described.

Also prior to any interview, you should have a list mentally prepared of your greatest strengths. You should also have, a specific example or two, which illustrates each strength, an example chosen from your most recent and most impressive achievements.
You should, have this list of your greatest strengths and corresponding examples from your achievements so well committed to memory that you can recite them at a moments notice. Then, once you uncover your interviewer’s greatest wants and needs, you can choose those achievements from your list that best match up.

As a general guideline, the 10 most desirable traits that all employers love to see in their employees are:

1. A proven track record as an achiever…especially if your achievements match up with the employer’s greatest wants and needs.
2. Intelligence…management “savvy”.
3. Honesty…integrity…a decent human being.
4. Good fit with corporate culture…someone to feel comfortable with…a team player who meshes well with interviewer’s team.
5. Likeability…positive attitude…sense of humor.
6. Good communication skills.
7. Dedication…willingness to walk the extra mile to achieve excellence.
8. Definiteness of purpose…clear goals.
9. Enthusiasm…high level of motivation.
10. Confident…healthy…a leader.

 

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Interview Tip: How To Act In The Age Of Too Much Information

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On a job interview you may get the question: Tell me about yourself.

 About 80% of all interviews begin with this “innocent” question. Many candidates, unprepared for the question, skewer themselves by rambling, recapping their life story, delving into ancient work history or sharing TOO much of their personal matters.

ANSWER: Start with the present and tell why you are well qualified for the position. Remember that the key to all successful interviewing is to match your qualifications to what the interviewer is looking for. In other words you must sell what the buyer is buying. This is the single most important strategy in job hunting.

So, before you answer this or any question it’s imperative that you try to uncover your interviewer’s greatest need, want, problem or goal. To do so, you can follow this one tip:

As early as you can in the interview, ask for a more complete description of what the position entails. You might say: “I have a number of accomplishments I’d like to tell you about, but I want to make the best use of our time together and talk directly to your needs. To help me do, that, could you tell me more about the most important priorities of this position? All I know is what I (heard from the recruiter, read in the classified ad, etc.)”

Then, ALWAYS follow-up with a second and possibly, third question, to draw out his needs even more. Surprisingly, it’s usually this second or third question that unearths what the interviewer is most looking for.
You might ask simply, “And in addition to that?…” or, “Is there anything else you see as essential to success in this position?:
This process will not feel easy or natural at first, because it is easier simply to answer questions, but only if you uncover the employer’s wants and needs will your answers make the most sense. Practice asking these key questions before giving your answers, the process will feel more natural and you will be light years ahead of the other job candidates you’re competing with.
After uncovering what the employer is looking for, describe why the needs of this job bear striking parallels to tasks you’ve succeeded at before. Be sure to illustrate with specific examples of your responsibilities and especially your achievements, all of which are geared to present yourself as a perfect match for the needs he has just described.

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2014 in Life Coaching

 

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Do You Need A Job?

simply-hired

Finding a job can be a job in itself. Below are some links to some job hunting websites. Share them with anyone you know needs employment.

www.careerbuilder.com

www.entertainmentcareers.net

www.idealist.org

www.indeed.com

www.monster.com

www.simplyhired.com

www.opportunityknocks.org

And if you need some help, The Super Organizer is here!! I can update or create your resume; I can train you for an interview; Help you with appointment setting or life coach you in general. You can contact me at thesuperorganizer.com/contact

 

 
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Posted by on June 4, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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